Eric Laffoon
Date Time Functions

Development 2 comments

Score 56%
44 Dislikes
Apr 21 2008
I don't think it was the wrong link, but I know the server was down for a bit. I checked on the newest version and downloaed it just to be sure. If it's not working now something would have to be really weird. - Apr 01 2008

Development 57 comments

Score 83%
17 Dislikes
Nov 02 2009
There's a sizable difference between approaching with a different mind set and recommending others not use it. If for instance you are an avid Python programmer and used to PyQt that is another matter, and hardly relevent to most users. It is the fact that you had your information incorrect and advised people not to use it that prompted the troll response. Sorry if inaccurate, but your post was not in the best form.

First of all you may be surprised to know that many KDE developers feel it is easier to just use C++ and don't see the logic in Kommander. So you're not alone, you're just not in the majority. The logic with Kommander is you draw your interface and then run your logic in widgets, which is an object oriented type of thinking.

Before answering your question I contend that with PyQt, KJSEmbed or any C++ bindings you have to know what is being done with the classes and architecture of Qt/KDE to effectively use the bindings. I've sat through numerous sessions of developers proudly extolling how accurately they follwed the KDE model. I haven't done much but look at some docs, so maybe you have contrary experience.

To access settings in Kommander with Python you have several ways. Up front though I do admit, it's not what I plan to have in KDE4 where it will be functionaly identical. First off Python has DCOP bindings. The initial parser in Kommander was little more than a DCOP interface. However it's rather limited, but useful if you don't need to do anything fancy, just practical. Using PyQt you can access the QObject. Don't ask me how Python does it, but I know it has many of the types of Qt whereas Kommander is simply text.

So in C++ it would be
const QObjectList * QObject::children () const
This returns a list of children. You should be able to use the interface to QObject, get that list and reference child("isChecked") for instance to see if a checkbox is checked.

The research I've done for this has been related to KDE4 where I understand from my friend Sebastian Sauer who wrote Kross that it is easy to expose virtually every property and slot of an object to any DBUS enabled language.

The paradox is I need people working with those languages to help insure the interface works well for them. The function browser makes coding easy if you just have a vague idea what the functions are, and my objective is to add support for other languages here.

Even in the worst case, if you find all the current methods too difficult, it's quite easy to create a plugin, which will put your functions in the function browser. So for instance even in the KDE3 version one could create a map of functions including the bindings and make native Python function calls for anything Kommander does, and anything C++ does that Kommander does not.

At a base level though, if you are more comfortable typing commands to draw a window than visually drawing it then you are both statistically unusual and not a good prospect for Kommander. Nothing wrong with that.

The point is that Kommander does have extensive docs now, does have an excellent text editor and can be accessed internally with DCOP enabled Python and PyQt. If you were to decide to try it and were interested in helping I'd be happy to work with you on one of our lists to help to make sure Kommander is more useful to more developers. I think your evaluation was out of date, but it's also true that some people have enough difference in their approach as not to be compatible. Kommander was initally modelled after a program called Kaptain, which at first I could not see any use for. It was a paradigm shift for me. If there is a way you and I can make the "big tent" fit what you do that would be great, and if not we both have something we like. ;-) - Feb 26 2008
Nice troll. I hoped I'd never see the day... Let's inject some facts here.

1) It's Kommander, not Commander
2) With Python you have to learn a language whereas with Kommander you can point and click with a function browser... which is why there are so many Kommander scripts here that it has it's own content category.
3) With Py-Qt you are directly accessing the C++ class structure to do things and manually writing your windows scripting instead of drawing them visually and rendering them with a Qt library. I found it easier to learn C++ and use Designer without the extra layer of Python to learn.
4) The editor has had syntax highlighting for several years. The new release adds highlighting for the new parser. In fact it's been the Kate part for a few years so it has Python highlighting too.
5) The help file is included and it's 946 KB in my source directory. (That's larger than the entire initial release of Quanta Plus) However I can point you to numerous applications where people never wrote any code and had great success with Kommander. I also have a mailing list and answer every user question on it. It must be a lot easier to tell people not to use Kommander here than to ask me for help via email.

As to whether you should use Py-Qt or Kommander, why choose? Python can easily be used within Kommander using #!/usr/bin/python which means full access with DCOP bindings and the ability to use PyQt also, which can further extend Kommander by accessing Qt's QObject class. You know what that is right? It means anything you can do in C++... and you're not using Python to draw your window, but C++, though you didn't write it, you drew it. You can also use PHP, Ruby, Perl, Rexx or if you're truly insane, scheme, in Kommander, which you can't do with Py-Qt.

I'd like to think you don't mean to be some kind of a rude dumbass, but after staying up till 4 AM every night the last 6 weeks working on this and falling behind in my work you make a summary judgement without even reading the changelog, let alone downloading, then advise others to ignore my work? I think I'd rather buy Steve Ballmer lunch than take this from a member of the community, and I'd rather have my head shaved with a rusty knife than be in the same room with baldy. Your opinion seems rooted in fertilizer, not factual relevent and up to date observations. If there is anything people should be wary of it is taking counsel no more researched or thought out than yours. - Feb 25 2008
That depends on what window you're talking about. The editor is a hacked early Qt Designer and as such is only partially right with KDE. I have set up the special window settings on the text edit dialog for the editor no problem.

In the just released version you have full access to slots, so while window and widget position and size information are blocked normally in the signal/slot dialog and functions you can call the slot directly for a window to set this on a Kommander dialog. - Feb 25 2008
The one shipped with which version of Quanta+? The way your question is worded I could answer by saying nothing, or everything listed on this page. Unless you are running Quanta from a kdewebdev beta the difference is that you could make a basic dialog before and now you have all kinds of new features. Other than a conceptual proof of concept release all the new development has been since the 3.2 feature freeze. Why not just check it out if you're interested in Kommander? - Jul 20 2004
We're working on Kommander, the docs and a web site and we really can't do all of them well at the same time. There are docs listed here that you can look at and there was a recent article on the Dot.

To answer your question, I can't do that well in the space allotted and a thumbnail won't give a true picture. A sparse explantion is it is a visual dialog builder derived from Qt Designer and an executor. But that fails to mention that it will do full applications soon, can create mini applications without scripting, can use any scripting language, creates applications that don't need to be compiled but run at compiled speed, uses DCOP for interaction, etc... It is focused at several groups including novice users. In short it is being designed to be the easiest tool you can use for quickly building small applications.

Kommander uses several key concepts and the phrase "A picture is worth a thousand words" comes to mind. To really appreciate it you have to see it in action. We have a nice set of example dialogs to see how it works. If it sounds interesting try it. - Jun 21 2004
You are the lucky one huh? ;-)

There is a file in there to recreate teh make files and you can correct it. Before you do your configure do this...

make -f Makefile.cvs

This will rebuild your configuration and makefiles. In fact my Simple Installer here (made with Kommander) has that option built in. This should do it. If there is anything residual causing problems then after you could do...

make distclean

But it should not be needed. BTW please note the changelog on this page if you grabbed it within 24 hours of release there is a bug. Fixing it is the 3 lines of code listed, copy and paste.

Enjoy! - Jun 13 2004
Yes, yes and yes!
I sent you an email proposal for Kommander the start of this week. We plan to be ready for a big completion of the major feature enhancements in time for KDE 3.3. I'm happy to go over that with anyone. Also I thought Andras submitted a proposal for Quanta.

We will do whatever we have to in order to correct any oversight. - Jun 05 2004
This is somewhat less than optimal for our design path, but we're glad it works for you. You can run multiple scripts and multiple languages from within Kommander. We're addressing what you're doing from a different perspective.

First of all you can package multiple dialogs in a shell script and call the main dialog using makeself. This is very cool because you can use it for an installer. We're setting up standard KDE directories for Kommander projects... this means you can have multiple dialogs and also scripts there. (In the future there will be rc files and XML-GUI.) The main dialog will be called from a desktop icon or menu. Using our installer you can transfer a single file that is self installing. We will also be using KStuff soon to share files.

Currently you can put multiple dialogs in one dialog by taking the text of the dialog and escaping all the double quotes, then enclosing it in quotes, putting it in a LineEdit widget, collpasing the widget (invisible) and calling it. However the project directory is far more elegant and does not add a lot of programming overhead to our already long design list. - Jun 05 2004
My thinking exactly. However getting an application into the already very large kdelibs takes some doing. We have not been compelling enough yet. Kommander is part of kdewebdev which is part of the official KDE packages. So that makes the odds good it will be on a system. We require it for Quanta Plus so we have to have it in kdewebdev or kdelibs. Otherwise we make a new requirement for non KDE users to load Quanta.

Another useful tool is the Kommander compiler by Marc Britton. This allows developers to offer a compiled version. I think I'll bang on it some and make it available soon. - May 26 2004
External data can also be retrived by scripts, DCOP or the use of @readSettings and @writeSettings. Widgets can be manipulated with DCOP. So the recent addition of being able to pass parameters is great, but it is just one tool in your toolbox. ;-) - May 26 2004
Kommander Database Plugin

Development 3 comments

Score 59%
41 Dislikes
Sep 19 2006
Install hk_classes. If you have Knoda installed it uses them. Possibly your distribution strips out headers to save a few precious KB of memory (right!) and you need to install devel packages. Of course there is always installing from source, which messes with your package management but makes sure you can build. - Oct 04 2006

Graphics 7 comments

Score 58%
42 Dislikes
Mar 09 2006
> Why cannot GTK apps get posted here. KDE is not about toolkits.

How utterly freaking clueless are you? KDE is a set of applications and an application framework based on kdelibs which is an extention of the Qt toolkit. The domain name here specifically references KDE apps. You can get general toolkit open source applications on You can run GTK apps on KDE, but I can also use an emulator and run Windows apps too, so by your logic we should post them too? Sorry, that's just ridiculous!

The question is valid, especially considering the irritating behavior of some GTK widgets and dialogs. It's curious to say the least. Is the author planning to port this? Why is it here? - Mar 11 2006
ALSA MIDI Kommander

Audio 1 comment

by plcl
Score 63%
37 Dislikes
Mar 24 2008
How cool is this? I'm just getting ALSA MIDI sequencing working on my notebook so I can run my keyboard and work with my Zoom recorder to compose and record. The first thing that comes up was made with Kommander! Thanks! - Sep 24 2005
RedWolf WebDeveloper Studio

Development 14 comments

Score 63%
37 Dislikes
Aug 23 2005
First of all I don't like the term WYSIWYG because it's a fallacy with HTML. It could only be applied to desktop publishing like Scribus or very strict CSS. It's also painful to type 15 times in a reply. We call ours VPL for "Visual Page Layout" because that's what it really is, and because WYSIWYG has a reputation for mangling markup and we handle things differently.

Having said that Quanta was the first native tool on Linux with visual page development in KDE 3.2, but it's taken several incarnations of KHTML improvements and integration to make small progress. Quanta VPL processes only the nodes you edit leaving the rest of your markup alone and it produces strict W3C compliant markup as per your DTD. It is handling the complexity of doing things to this degree that have slowed interface issues.

As Andras said, Webcore and KDOM improvements mean the version in KDE 4 should offer an amazing user experience. In the meantime perhaps RedWolf will be able to do some fun things, being lighter and not so entangled with all the constraints we have to deal with. I hope to check it out soon. - Aug 24 2005
Quanta does have a visual mode so you havne't been stuck with NVU. Primarily it lacks good RMB interaction and some integration. However it is extensively scriptable and also templates can be used with it. The idea is to have users add functionality, which should get better as we bring KNewStuff online. It also can do full W3C compliance unlike NVU.

Since Quanta uses KHTML the real advances to where it's better than Dreamweaver in this mode are with the upcoming Webcore changes and KDOM. That means the real interesting stuff with Quanta like real time XSLT are scheduled for KDE 4. - Aug 23 2005
Good for you. It's good to see something else being done on KDE to keep it diverse, though I also like additional help for our project. As far as not liking Quanta... Did you even send me an "I don't like your program because... " email? ;) - Aug 23 2005
Quanta Plus

Development 72 comments

Score 84%
16 Dislikes
Jan 26 2007
First, thanks to the dev team for the only web IDE I've ever actually liked.

I always love reading things like this. KMDI can seem a little disconcerting at first and you can get the "classic look" as Andras pointed out. However if you give Ideal mode a try you may come to like it. Collapsable panels can be handy. I've come to enjoy auto collapsing panels for more editor space. - Dec 10 2004
You are correct in your guess that what you're observing is not normal. All the cursors work fine on mine. This would actually be a kdelibs issue or possibly some oddity in how each was configured and built, though this type of thing should not happen. You should check with Debian people as there is some possibility something is happening between mixing binary builds. Minor variations in binaries can cause lots of niggling problems. - Oct 13 2004
Hey thanks for the encouragement! You are what makes open source great! It's comforting to know that an initial effort by a student in France is no threat to a multi billion dollar company throwing everything at it.

VPL is very much incomplete feature wise. However for those lacking the fundamental understanding of markup to discern the difference VPL already has three advantages over FlunkPage. (Coincidentally they are what we said it would have.)

  1. It creates valid DTD specific markup.

  2. It does not reformat your entire document, but only formats the node you edit.

  3. The CVS version adds access to a full set of CSS tools for styling.

Admittedly it has some pretty glaring shorcomings now. Undo/redo and copy and paste proved to be far more complex and unstable than we hoped on the first try. Sorry we failed to live up to your expectations on the first try. Then again you probably aren't old enough to remember MS Windows 1.0 and 2.0 where MS got the reputation that none of their software was worth using until version 3. That makes a student in France look pretty good next to a multi billion dollar company... but after reading your comments maybe we should beat Nicolas up anyway.

Of course that would not be wise as we continue to work on VPL. The foundational groundwork is there for the rest of the features though the 3.3 time line is making it hard to add much of it. However by 4.0 we should have all the basic features and XML editing with XSLT and other things I doubt Flunkpage will have. I invite you to continue your extremely inefficient non CSS based static page nightmare on software built by criminals though. You'll want to avoid our highly productive Rapid Object Templates since we suck and the interface may be too innovative for windoze users.

BTW I'm pleased to say that your testing, patches, suggestions and donations did not suck. Then again that was really easy not to do... wasn't it? Thanks for helping to make open source excellence a reality. VPL has been a monumental task and we appreciate your encouragement to continue it. - Jul 07 2004
Hey you spelled my name right! ;) BTW KDE has been my number one desktop choice for years. When you see what we do next with Kommander you'll understand. Wait until you see what we do next. Quanta is just reaching the point to be a suitable launch platform for the really fun stuff. It's also the next desktop killer app, along with Kommander. - May 08 2004
There is no reason to recommend 3.2.1 or CVS. 3.2.2 is current stable release and 3.3-BE2 is very stable and much nicer. That's what's posted here. Please try it. - May 08 2004
Set CD-ROM Speed

Utilities 15 comments

Score 76%
24 Dislikes
Oct 04 2006
It's fun to see such enthusiasm about Kommander! Make sure you are on our user list for help.

For a little more fun try creating a MainWindow in Qt Designer and saving it. Rename it to *.kmdr and open it in Kommander. Especially the new development releases the support is very close to where it needs to be. You can create script objects and connect Actions. It's coming along. Enjoy! - Nov 22 2004

Video 15 comments

Score 79%
21 Dislikes
Jul 31 2005
We need to finish our project tools, but here is how we handled it for the simple intaller. Install to
The idea being that in the future we want to have kmdr-executor without arguments list all kmdr-* directories with application information. I hope in the coming weeks to release an up to date installer release.

There are other advantages to this. You can have multiple dialogs installed there and call them with @dialog(name.kmdr) and this will work great. You can even have other resources there.

To run the program create a script named katiuska and put it in /usr/bin.
kmdr-executor $KDEDIR/share/apps/kmdr-katiuska/katiuska.kmdr

Maybe you'll want to help us with the installer too. ;-) - Nov 15 2004

Wallpaper Other 23 comments

by kairo
Score 37%
63 Dislikes
Jun 03 2006
I agree about freedom of speech. I fully support it. That doesn't mean that all exercises of that freedom are not asinine, idiotic and in poor taste.

KDE sites are not the place to discuss politics so I won't go into a diatribe on how terribly skewed I think this is. As an American though I can say that a majority of Americans who voted this month do not share this view. Perhaps a study of history might help to understand real practitioners of genocide and tyranny and not some trendy "me too" scapegoat.

The perfect world where nobody suffers consequences does not exist. We could easily extend the absurdities to Ben and Jerry's ice cream for those who die of obesity or the medical community for bungling and killing people. How about the pharmaceutical companies? Dead is dead, right? After all what do you care about why your loved ones are dead?

My mother died of a blood clot the day after visiting a doctor who knew she was at extremely high risk for several circumstances my research shows any idiot in first year med school should know. Yet she was not prescribed an anti-coagulant. Does this doctor stand for death? It would be easy to take it personally as I miss her every day but in fact my mother should have also known her risk factors and my being angry with her doctor serves no purpose... So I got over it.

People you love will die for stupid reasons. Everyone is loved by someone. Add up the number of people who died at the hands of leaders throughout history and Bush comes in very low. For the US for example more deaths happened because of decisions by FDR, Eisenhour, Truman, JFK, Johnson, Nixon and Bush Sr. Truman was the only world leader to ever use nuclear weapons. As horrible as that was historians estimate it saved millions of lives on both sides ending WWII. None of these American presidents have had people lined up, mass murdered and put in mass graves. Other leaders do not come off so well, like Joe Stalin who killed 30 million of his own people because he was paranoid. Too bad it's not as trendy to focus on genocidal maniacs as the popularly elected leader of the country that started a domino effect in self government. At least we can be grateful many despots and their regimes have been removed from power, in many cases by resolute American presidents, leaving less who truly stand for death. - Nov 15 2004
by bauno
Score 80%
20 Dislikes
Mar 04 2006
You may disagree of course. ;-) I'm not sure we dasgree that much. I like Knode, but when I'm looking where there are images posted in two parts and I just want to view them I think it should do that. I would agree it doesn't need to be able to grab videos, but it would be great to not have to duplicate a lot between them.

Anyway I want to try this app out but I'm running into something rather odd. First off, I use my system for work and it is amd64 so I go with standard -O2 optimizations. amd64 is already fast and testing how well ported gcc is can be left to others. ;-)

Here's what I'm getting. In the configure it dies...
checking for uudeview.h... no
configure: error: Error: uudeview.h not found!

I've emerged uudeview 0.5.20 and it seems very odd Gentoo would cause it to not install the header so I even went to the home page and got the tgz file and looked inside. Guess what? No uudeview.h!

Don't you just love it when they make your life easy? So what do I do to run this with the latest uudeview without a lot of hacking? ;-) - Oct 17 2004
This looks really good, like all the features that Knode has been seriously missing. In fact Knode is utterly lame here and it would be cool to either merge this or make it yet another application in KDE/Extragear if it's as good as it looks. The one thing I did not see was if it had yenc support.

Anyway, getting to the "but" of my subject... Why does your download link only offer an i386 RPM? I had to search for the source. Who cares if I can load an RPM? Especially since I'm running Gentoo on an AMD64.

Optimizations are nice. Who do you know running a 386 today? Use the source luke - Oct 16 2004

Education 5 comments

Score 46%
54 Dislikes
Sep 12 2004
Projects are driven by the desire of someone to do it. I had been focused on scripting languages before I took over the Quanta project, and I sponsored a developer in Eastern Europe. Now I can code in C++ and I have contributors from around the world helping to pay. I also read the developer of Kpresenter learned C++ to make the application. So the excuse doesn't fly. Desire overcomes skill every time. I can show you skilled coders not contributing to counter those people who arrived without the skills and succeeded.

I like your idea, but I am already running a group of projects, not just one. The shortage in FLOSS is not in the idea department unfortunately. ;-)

Besides that, search for Kommander. With Kommander you could have at least provided a dialog window and even had it do something. It is the easiest development environment and you can get people scripting and use the huge amount of code out there that has shell command abilities to assemble a visual tool. It's still in work, but you could offer something more to start. You can also get help on our list. You may be surpised to find that you could build the tool you want with almost no programming at all, just a little reasearch and scripting.

What are you waiting for? - Sep 12 2004
Simple Installer

System Software 26 comments

Score 74%
26 Dislikes
Aug 06 2004
For some reason the new screenshots have not been updated. The interface has had a clean up, but this is also a dialog based application and as such it has different constraints. On the positive a number of developer's wives are using this to install software, including mine, so I don't think it's that confusing. Did you try using it? Did you read the help?

I need to read the usability guidelines? It's interesting that I lead several projects that rank in the top 10 ratings wise here and this project has a higher user satisfaction rating than Kword and Kspread. I've worked with the usability people too. I hope you aren't suggesting I read up on menus on dialogs? ;-)

In case you missed it this is a user editable application. You just need the Kommander editor and you can visually change it to your liking. Why don't you redesign it and send it to me and if it's better I'll use it. - Aug 07 2004
Well it started out simple. ;-) It has grown.

However I would point out a few things. Using automake means that it is really much less complex than it could be, but the very concept is intimidating for people. When a friend contacted me to thank me because his wife could now install programs I felt the same way now that my wife can install. I would say that actually running it you need very little of it but more is there and you come to appreciate what it can do for you. It is difficult to understand operation from a picture. From the moment you open it you get tooltips and interaction that guides you, without being condescending. The settings give you control and so far the dialog is highly rated... but pondering what you said, as well as feature improvements in Kommander, has given me some ideas to make it even more user friendly for version 0.7.

Note that at least this program is incredibly easy to install as it does not need to be compiled and has a self extracting install program. - Jun 17 2004
This is really getting to be a fun question. I should just say "NO!!!" because I've already answered it here and in emails... (sigh) but I'll answer it for the umpteenth time.

  1. I don't use RPMs. I run Gentoo because I personally think RPMs are a blight on Linux. Kommander offers no compile applications to also make them not need RPMs.

  2. Kommander applications are not pre compiled so you can edit them rather easily using the visual Kommander Editor. There are probably still under 100 lines of bash scripting and Kommander specials in Simple installer so anyone with the slightest motivation and the ability to point, click and read could assemble a Kommander dialog for checkinstall in a matter of minutes.

I encourage people to build their own Kommander apps and even to fork this one. It's GPL. Have at it! In fact I would prefer someone forked this then to be asked again if I will incorporate something I don't use and can't test that they could do in an evening if even if they never touched the editor before.

Join our mailing list and I will even help you. We will release docs hopefully with Alpha 5. - Jun 16 2004
As they say, so what? I used to use KConfigure, but as the link you pointed out highlights, back with KDE 2x. It was a very nice piece of software. However you still have to compile and build it.

Conversely this is XML files with embedded scripts. You don't need an RPM, or all the hideous binary compatibility issues that go with it. If you wanted to tweak Kconfigure you needed to grab the sources, load it up in Kdevelop and write C++. With this Kommander file, it is the sources and you can directly load it in the editor, point and click or toss in some bash or PHP.

As I've said many times, this was just something I put together for my wife to compile with. I never expected it would be one of the 60 highest rated apps here, but since it is I'll keep improving it. What's cool too is with KDE 4 this will automatically update. This is really more a showcase for Kommander for me. I hope a lot more apps like this start showing up. - Jun 10 2004
If you have Quanta you will have Kommander... unless your RPM is badly hacked up. However not having the Kommander executor means some things won't work in Quanta, like the quick start dialog. So just get Quanta. - Jun 10 2004
Thank you. That's very kind of you. I'm working on version 0.5 that is even more improved. I came up with the idea of this because my wife can never find her notes on installing. I'm actually a little surprised by how well this has been received. - Jun 07 2004
I'm currently working on a Portage installer and an ebuild creator as I run Gentoo. There are three things to consider here...

  1. I don't have an itch there

  2. The name "Simple Installer" says the mission of the tool... simple install from source

  3. This is a Kommander application so you can extend it

I keep explaining Kommander but it seems like the convenience of being able to create an application like I did here with a few lines of shell scripting is inconvenient because then you have to do something. ;-)

Open this application up in the Kommander editor and look inside. Feel free to fork it for your purposes. It's GPL'd and it's incredibly easy to modify. Kommander is being designed to put application design into the hands of end users. No doubt some well see this as an "unfair lowering of the bar" for the age old "where's your patch?" question. Instead of saying "I don't know how to program" soon it will have be "I don't know how to point and click". ;-)

Have some fun! You won't believe how easy it is to make an application like this with Kommander. Version 0.4 has a sum total of 80 lines of code, many of which are "else", "then", "fi" and "@widgetText". Version 0.1 had less than 40 lines of code. Kommander requires less code than any tool ever. Really simple dialogs can be built with no code at all. - Jun 01 2004
I just found out that the support for the features I need was only released in kdewebdev 3.3 BE2. So we will shortly release a snapshot of Kommander and of just the executor. We plan on a major release soon, but I think we need an interim release now. - May 25 2004
It does use the console. ;-) It launches consoles pre-configured with environment variables and with the correct strings. It also launches kdesu to get you root console.

I use the console, though I did like an app that managed this some time back. I made this because my wife can never remember how to compile. - May 25 2004
> nice app... but if your still on it, maybe extend it to let it easilly create rpm's and deb's ;-)

I've seen apps that are supposed to make creating RPMs easy. The thing is... I have Debian on my server but I don't administer it. I use Gentoo and Michal and I will be creating apps for ebuilds. As you might guess that means I think RPMs are eevil. ;-)

The good news though is that you can subscribe to the Kommander user list at and get help developing the dialog. If you look at this one there is a little bit of bash in it but it's mostly point and click. Kommander is not quite to end user simplicity to use but we're working on it.

In the mean time grab what you like out of Kommander dialogs. I should tip my hat to the Emerge Tool here that gave me the idea to use his approach to calling the konsole. This dialog demonstrates a few little tricks we came up with to pass multiple args to konsole.Kommander always seems to be about making software do what was never really intended. ;-) - May 25 2004
I just thought of this and was going to do it. The problem is that a lot of the better features of Kommander are new and I don't remember what version or Quanta some shipped with. We're addressing this for a Kommander release we plan to do next month. In the mean time I'm sure everything I'm using will work if you have Quanta 3.2.2 or 3.3 BE2 installed. I think the new features will work with Quanta 3.2. I'll post the update shortly and I'll know with the feedback. ;-)

The Kommander release coming up will really begin to make for more and better Kommander programs. - May 25 2004

System Software 31 comments

Score 76%
24 Dislikes
Aug 03 2004
I spoke with the developers of KPortage. One was no longer involved and the other was too busy. I also spoke with Caleb about this. We received the CVS of KPortage and were going to talk with other developers about bringing it up to date and making it part of KDE. Unfortunately we were also very busy with Quanta and Kommander and none of us were very familiar with Python.

In the course of things we decided that it would actually be easier and faster to build it in Kommander once we had passed the KDE 3.3 feature freeze. This would also make a good showcase. So we've been working with several parts doing the design, reviewing Kportage and new portage tools.

We are still planning to release a revival of this application built in Kommander, and a key advantage is that Kommander applications are scriptable so various users can actually get involved in the development.

Of course it's cool to see Kentoo too. We welcome all projects and any developers wishing to collaborate. Our design will be similar to KPortage but will take into account development since then and will have the same kind of attention to detail that Quanta and Kommander have... of course you can use Kentoo right now. ;-) - Jul 27 2004

System Software 8 comments

Score 55%
45 Dislikes
May 31 2004
> If things should be as easy as under Windows, you might want to make this tool for debs, or rpms. Gentoo is not the easy linux.

Amazing. Sarah runs Gentoo. Why would you think she would want to develop a tool for a different system? As she pointed out the installer is being build for Kommander and will work on any distribution. Kommander applications don't need to be compiled so I think we are on our way to being easy there.

With all due respects to other distros... RPMs are not easy when you can't find the one you want or are forced to shovel CDs into your system due to dependency hell. Debian is a fine distribution and I use it on the server, but you have to sometimes search our your "unstable" tree just to find a new stable release of desktop software. It's not that easy either. Gentoo is more work to install... but I can update my system by typing "emerge world" in a root console and I never have to shovel CDs in or deal with binary dependency issues. Easy?

People think windows is easy, but they forget about how many times they have to reload a corrupted system, having to keep virus software up to date, trashing an infected system, stability and applications that have notorious bugs as old as 5-6 years that have internet petitions.

Clearly what is easy is a matter of an often distored perspective. It would be nice if you did not go about offering more distored views about a distribution you probably have no experience with. BTW you would be amzed how many people contact me with Quanta questions and identify themselves as newbies running Gentoo. Your Gentoo label doesn't fit. - Jun 01 2004
Do you even know what Kommander is? First of all what Sarah has here is two applications, an installer and a Portage tool. Second, the interfaces are visually drawn in the editor and there are just a few lines of bash scripting it... though it could just as easily be Perl, Python, Ruby or any other language.

Kommander is object oriented because it binds text and scripts to widgets. So it tends to be easy to replace parts or build new applications from old ones. They are also easier to write than plugins. Why don't you just grab Kommander and start building it? You can join our user mailing list and share our ideas and scripts to use in your tool. Simple. - Jun 01 2004

Graphics 15 comments

Score 66%
34 Dislikes
Nov 27 2006
Ah Ha! So this is why I'm getting hits on showing Kallery. What a guy! You should change the address... - May 16 2004

Database 40 comments

by knorr
Score 81%
19 Dislikes
Oct 29 2006
There's a benefit to combining activity and to having separate projects with differences. Choice is good. In this case though you are way off the mark. Knoda has been around for years and usable for years. Kexi may turn out more popular eventually but Knoda was here first. There is also Rekall. So why complain when you have a choice? Knoda predates all of these so don't pick on Horst about duplicating efforts. - May 14 2004
Quanta+ icon

Individual Icons/-sets 10 comments

by luci
Score 68%
32 Dislikes
Dec 16 2003
My handle sequitur goes back a long ways. I was looking for something cool that wasn't taken with an ISP. Since non sequitur is used to mean "not relevent" I thought sequitur was cool because it made me automatically "relevent". ;-) Anyway, it ended up getting used pretty much everywhere because it's almost always available. - Oct 22 2003
I went ahead and created the icons from the gimp file at 48, 32, 22 and 16 pixel sizes. On my system the smaller ones aren't so clear. Maybe they're okay for others? The two smaller icons could be redone with less of the features in them and I might do that but I'm leaving it to the artist.

Now I'm inclined to keep the splash that goes with it. One request... can you look at our new project graphics and re-do them? Any other graphic touch would be cool and I still need more icons but I do like this so far. - Oct 21 2003
Geez, it's about time somebody did a nice icon for us! This is great! I'm going to use it! - Oct 21 2003
Quanta+ 3.1.2 Splash

Various Stuff 11 comments

by luci
Score 55%
45 Dislikes
Jul 10 2003
I actually like this much better than other's I've seen. The big one is overly spacious and the little one is nice but maybe a bit cramped. Granted we can't translate the text but it's not that big of a deal in my opinion. I will put this up to our developers and user list to see if they like it more. Before we can accept it though I have a request of the author. ;-) Get the files from that start with "wiz" and remake them in the same theme and remake our icon in the same theme. If you can do that nicely we could have a winner. - Jul 09 2003
karamba multi-news

Karamba & Superkaramba 13 comments

by Matti
Score 53%
47 Dislikes
Jul 08 2003
Why not use Kommander? It's got to be the best dialog tool IMHO. - Jun 19 2003
Quanta Plus 3.0

Various Stuff 7 comments

by patch
Score 60%
40 Dislikes
Nov 19 2002
I was thinking of re-doing the splash for 3.1. I'm also willing to accept any submission to review. this splash is not bad, but not making my socks roll up and down.

BTW it's true... your faithful Quanta project manager and sponsor did the splash. It's a matter of taste. Thanks for your vote. - Nov 19 2002